The ethical fashion revolution

As London Fashion Week approaches, the hype behind ethical fashion is going through the roof. But how many of our favourite high street shops offer fairly traded clothes? Amita Mistry investigates.

“Young girl working fairtrade Young girl working on a loom in Aït Benhaddou, Morocco in May 2008” - image is courtesy of NationMaster.com

“Young girl working fairtrade Young girl working on a loom in Aït Benhaddou, Morocco in May 2008” - image is courtesy of NationMaster.com

Are you wearing or do you own anything from the high street giant Primark? If so, find the label and read where it was made.

Done? If you’re still looking, it’s because Primark’s labels don’t reveal the location of the garment’s origin. The company argues that there is no law requiring retailers to state where the clothing is made.

Primark is every bargain hunter’s candy shop, full of cheap clothes that can be thrown away when the latest trend is phased out. Last June, it was investigated by undercover reporters from the BBC who revealed that the retailer used child labour (allegedly without their knowledge) to make their products. It was claimed that clothes were created by underpaid factory workers, many of whom took their work outside the factory to family members and children.

After BBC1’s Panorama made the issue public, the head of Primark spoke to a journalist about the allegations. Primark director Breege O’Donoghue said: “We detest that children have been used; we do not support that children should be used in our supply chain. These children are not in our factories. These three factories had stringent audit and inspection in the last 18 months these children were in unauthorised production.”

She added: “It’s against our terms of trade to employ children. Our code of conduct was breached, our standards were breached – this is why these factories will no longer be doing business with Primark.”

Developing countries reportedly rely on the forced labour of thousands of 10-to15-year-old children, who pick cotton to create clothes for western countries like ours. Each September, school children are forced to miss classes for up to two and a half months for cotton-picking. The children spend up to 11 hours a day working in the fields and earn less than two US dollars.

I decided to visit Primark in Nottingham to find out what the paying public thought about this. Hordes of shoppers wondered around with trademark blue baskets full to the brim with clothes. The long queue for the tills made it feel like it was Christmas Eve, while the staff stood at their folding stations as customers sifted through the piles of jeans desperate to find their size.

Asked about Primark’s reputation on garment production, one student shopper from Nottingham said: “I do wonder how they can charge so little, but I’m well into my overdraft and can’t afford expensive clothes. Primark has high fashion at affordable prices, which is what draws me in.”

Another customer remarked: “I guess ‘throw-away fashion’ is a bit of a waste, but in the current economic climate people are hunting for bargains more than ever before. It’s a shame, but I suppose we are keeping the people who make the garments in employment.”

Although Primark has made changes to stop child labour by shutting down the factories in India, this now leaves thousands of people unemployed. It seems as though they are more concerned with the reputation of the business rather than the need to help and support these underprivileged workers.

Fortunately, some people are doing their best to change the situation. At this season’s forthcoming fashion events, movers and shakers from the high fashion world are creating, promoting and showcasing ethical clothes.

Along with London Fashion Week’s estethica, which exhibits fashion by eco-loving designers (February 21-24), Pure London has also introduced Ethical Pure as part of its campaign to promote the designers who produce clothing that follows eco-friendly guidelines (February 8-10).

Meanwhile, February 23 to March 8 sees the annual fortnight dedicated to highlighting the work of the Fairtrade Foundation, a charity that seeks to ensure everyone can maintain a decent and dignified livelihood. Since its launch, the Fairtrade mark has not only changed the way in which corporations deal with their suppliers and how consumers shop on the high street, but it is also transforming the lives of millions of farmers, workers and their communities.

The desire to make even a small contribution towards helping the environment and the social welfare of others is a trend that has been embraced by many companies, from small specialist stores to big high-street chains. Debenhams, Monsoon and Marks & Spencer, for instance, all stock a Fairtrade cotton range.

Another outspoken campaigner is Jane Shepherdson, the retail guru who catapulted Topshop to star status. Now chief executive of the Whistles chain, she is also the non-executive director of People Tree (www.peopletree.co.uk), one of country’s first eco-chic brands. In addition, Shepherdson is transforming Oxfam’s charity shops into must-have destinations for eco-fashionistas.

These are just a few of the examples of people making waves in the ethical clothing movement. Yet, while much progress has already been made, there is still a significant way to go. Does the future of fashion lie in fairly traded clothes? Only time, and our shopping habits, will tell.

Let us know what you think by posting your comments on our MySpace page www.myspace.com/freeqmagazine.

For more information on Fairtrade Fortnight, visit: www.fairtrade.org.uk or http://www.bbc.co.uk/thread/blood-sweat-tshirts.

http://www.freeqmagazine.com/

BBC NEWS | UK | Bid to buck ‘fast fashion’ trend

Bid to buck ‘fast fashion’ trend

Women shopping 

The government has launched a campaign to tackle the environmental impact of a “fast fashion” culture.

About two million tonnes of clothing end up in landfill every year.More than 300 retailers, producers and designers are part of the “sustainable clothing action plan”, launched at the start of London Fashion Week.Ministers say customers should be sure clothing is made, sold and disposable “without damaging the environment or using poor labour practices”.The initiative outlines commitments to make fashion more sustainable throughout its lifecycle: from design and manufacture to retail and disposal.It hopes to draw attention to the environmental impact of cheap, throwaway clothes, which have become hugely popular on the High Street but are adding to the UK’s landfill.

Taking action

The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) says the clothing and textiles sector in the UK produces around 3.1m tonnes of carbon dioxide, 2m tonnes of waste and 70m tonnes of waste water per year.Gases such as CO2, emitted by fossil fuel burning, and methane, released from landfill sites, are widely believed to be contributing to global warming.As part of the action plan:

  • Marks and Spencer, Tesco and Sainsbury’s have pledged to increase their ranges of Fairtrade and organic clothing, and support fabrics which can be recycled more easily
  • Tesco is banning cotton from countries known to use child labour
  • Charities such as Oxfam and the Salvation Army will open more sustainable clothing boutiques featuring high quality second-hand clothing and new designs made from recycled garments
  • The Centre for Sustainable Fashion at the London College of Fashion will be resourced to provide practical support to the clothing sector
  • The Fairtrade Foundation will aim for at least 10% of cotton clothing in the UK to be Fairtrade material by 2012.

The Minister for Sustainability, Lord Hunt, said the plan represented a “concerted effort to change the face of fashion”.”Retailers have a big role to play in ensuring fashion is sustainable,” he said.”We should all be able to walk into a shop and feel the clothes we buy have been produced without damaging the environment or using poor labour practices, and that we will be able to re-use and recycle them when we no longer want them.

Complex challenges

Jane Milne, business environment director of the British Retail Consortium, said retailers should be “applauded, not criticised, for providing customers with affordable clothing, particularly during these tough economic times”.”They’re raising standards for overseas workers, offering clothes made from organic and Fairtrade cotton and encouraging the re-use and recycling of unwanted clothes,” she added.

The challenge is to reduce the amount of damage we are doing now, while a revised, sustainable model of consumption is created

Malcolm Ball, ASBCI chairmanThe ASBCI, the forum for clothing and textiles, said the industry was “very cognisant” of the environmental issues it faced and “highly motivated” to find solutions.Chairman Malcolm Ball said the challenges facing the industry and the consumer were “complex”.

Taking cotton as an example, he said organic cotton was highly desirable but represented only a fraction of world production, adding that growing it “requires vast amounts of the most precious resource on earth – water”.”There are many voices who argue the current Western model of fast and cheap fashion is totally unsustainable in the medium to long term,” he said.”The challenge is to reduce the amount of damage we are doing now, while a revised, sustainable model of consumption is created.”

Shoppers in London's Oxford Street 

Allana McAspurn, of ethical fashion campaign body Made-By, said change would be gradual: “It’s about continuous improvement – a step-by-step approach.”We’ve created a situation where we’ve got really cheap clothes and that’s not going to re-addressed overnight.”London Fashion Week runs from Friday until Wednesday.Lord Hunt is due to announce the sustainable clothing action plan at Friday’s launch of the sixth season of estethica, the world’s leading showcase of ethical designer fashion.

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BBC NEWS | UK | Bid to buck ‘fast fashion’ trend

Taller Flora – Design – British Council – Arts

Taller Flora

Taller Flora

 

http://www.britishcouncil.org/spacer.gifWork with Mexico’s leading ethical fashion label

Carla Fernandez, 34, is the founder of Taller Flora, a fashion label and mobile laboratory that travels throughout Mexico visiting indigenous communities, including those that specialise in handmade textiles. Taller Flora has developed a unique style, and is a leader through its business model of a fair-trade network and environmental policies that encourage responsible practice in the fashion industry.

Carla was chosen as the winner of the British Council’s International Young Fashion Entrepreneur Award after giving a presentation to a UK panel of leading industry figures including Colin McDowell MBE, Suzanne Tide-Frater, Julie Pinches, Alberto Bartoli and Alison Moloney. The winner had to demonstrate a keen understanding of and vision for the fashion industry in their country.

The judges stated that “She has a clear and distinct design philosophy, which is highly personal and representative of her cultural identity, while speaking to the international fashion industry. The IYFEY prize is a financial award to be spent on a project tailored to the winner’s specific interests while developing the relationship between the winner’s country and the UK. Carla’s project is to recruit a printed textile designer and menswear designer from the UK to work with her and the Taller Flora team in Mexico for five months. For more information about IYFEY and Carla’s work please click here.

Menswear Designer – Taller Flora is looking to recruit a talented and driven menswear designer to work with Carla Fernandez to develop tailoring within the Taller Flora label. The designer will be working with the artisans of the co-op Charro Mexicano, who are skilled in the traditional tailoring and embroidery skills of the national ‘charro’ suit. Two lines of clothing will be developed with Carla: Haute Couture, preserving the manual tradition; and ready-to-wear, in collaboration with Tramex, one of Mexico’s biggest menswear manufacturers.

Requirements:

·         Applicants should have a BA or MA in fashion or be a talented designer. Demonstrable competence of pattern cutting is mandatory

·         Ability to work independently

·         Team player with good interpersonal and communication skills

·         Knowledge of and an interest in ethical fashion

·         Knowledge of Spanish would be an asset

·         Must be a resident in the UK.

Textile Designer – Taller Flora is looking to recruit a textiles designer who will work on the printed textiles designs inspired by the work of artisans from the indigenous community of Tenango de Doria. This project will commence with a creative workshop with artisans who draw and embroider Tenangos, to help Taller Flora translate their traditional practices into contemporary fashion design. Two lines of clothing will be developed with Carla: Haute Couture, preserving the manual tradition; and ready-to-wear, translating drawings produced in the workshop into prints for mass-production. Requirements:

·         Applicants should have a BA or MA in textile design or be a talented print designer

·         Excellent freehand drawing skills

·         Knowledge of PhotoShop is mandatory

·         Silk screening experience

·         Ability to work independently

·         Team player with good interpersonal and communication skills

·         Knowledge of and an interest in ethical fashion

·         Knowledge of Spanish would be an asset

·         Must be a resident in the UK.

Conditions of employment:

·         The appointment will be on a 5 month contract, ideally starting at the end of August (exact dates to be negotiated).

·         Taller Flora offers a tax-free salary which is competitive according to Mexican standards which is $1200 per month.

·         An economy-class return air ticket will be provided.

·         Accommodation is not included but Taller Flora promises to assist in locating an apartment near to their studio, which is located in one of the trendiest spots of Mexico City.

How to apply: Designers interested in the project should apply with the following materials:

·         A short, written statement (not more than 300 words) outlining why you want to be part of this project.   

·         Up to 12 photographs of your work

·         The name and contact details (including a telephone number) of one person we may contact as a reference

·         Your CV

The deadline for applications is 16 June 2008. A shortlist of 6 candidates will be interviewed the week beginning 30th June 2008 For further information you can contact Alison Moloney on 020 7389 3157, Alison.Moloney@britishcouncil.org or Carla Fernandez at carla@flora2.com. Please send your application

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Taller Flora – Design – British Council – Arts

Thread – Fashion without victim (BBC)

Thread is the online fashion magazine dedicated to bringing you the latest in eco-fabulous style.

Thread

Ethical fashion is fashion that has been made, worn and passed on in a way that looks after people, animals and the environment. The clothes we feature in thread support this approach, making us essential viewing for fashion-conscious people who care about where their clothes come from. All clothes tick off at least one of these principles:

Made and traded sustainably – clothes and accessories where suppliers of raw materials receive a fair price and workers get a fair wage, with guaranteed rights. Ideally the trade brings new benefits to communities.

Made of sustainable materials – minimising the impact of fashion on the environment. Look out for clothes made from cool, organic cotton that are safer for farmers, garment workers and the environment, as they’re free from chemical pesticides and fertilisers. And clothes made from funky alternatives such as hemp and bamboo.

Recycled or vintage – keeping clothes out of landfill and cutting fabric waste in factories. Many of our clothes are classic vintage items and stylish one-off pieces made from recycled garments, factory off-cuts and remnants.

Ethical fashion is becoming cool in its own right, making the move from catwalk to high street, with a list of celebrity fans such as Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman, Brad Pitt, Leona Lewis and Leonardo di Caprio.

Thread shows you how to get the look you want in an eco-glam way through our unique mix of affordable fashion, exclusive videos, photo galleries and thought-provoking features.

There are so many ways you can get involved from shopping ethically on the high street and buying vintage or second hand to swapping clothes with friends and customising the clothes you already have. There are options to suit your style, your budget and your views. Click here to go there>>>

http://www.october.co.uk
t shirt printing, screen printing, embroidery

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